Be anxious for nothing

Philippians 4:6

St. Paul is writing to the Philippians. He starts in Chapter 4:6-7 by saying, Be anxious for nothing. Now we might say, good advice Paul, thanks, but you do not understand. After all, we have disease, civil unrest, the problem of generational prejudice, murder bees, plus a stadium sized asteroid making a close pass at earth. How can I not be anxious? Paul is not writing in a vacuum. Paul’s command, Be anxious for nothing is not an option. All of our undue cares intrude into an arena that belongs to God alone. Having undue care knocks God out of His Father role and makes us father instead of child. Let God be Father. Paul goes on to tell us to pray to God, to ask, for there are no areas of our lives that are of no concern to God. Pray with confidence, thanksgiving, and receive peace.

June and warmer weather. The world continues to change – and some of that change has long been required. Read our Commitment to Dignity.

June also brings thoughts of our heavenly, spiritual, and earthly fathers. We are called to action. Our newsletter contains information on various summer events being held virtually including PolishFest, our Men’s Spiritual Retreat, and Kurs. As of now we plan to reopen on July 19th with one Holy Mass and with certain required conditions. We will do so responsibly and with great care and only if the situation continues to improve! We look forward with hope and continue to be the faithful church at home and together.

Read about all it in our June 2020 Newsletter.

Would you destroy
yourself?

So the LORD God cast a deep sleep on the man, and while he was asleep, he took out one of his ribs and closed up its place with flesh. The LORD God then built up into a woman the rib that he had taken from the man. When he brought her to the man, the man said: “This one, at last, is bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh; this one shall be called ‘woman,’ for out of ‘her man’ this one has been taken.”

God’s wisdom and His work are ineffable. Ineffable, per Webster and others means too great or extreme to be expressed or described in words. God’s wisdom reaches out to us throughout history and speaks to us again and again of His design, His meaning, and His warnings.

As we heard in the Gospels throughout the summer, those who were following Jesus were doing so for miracles and bread. They weren’t really FOLLOWING Jesus – living like Jesus, taking His words to heart and changing their hearts. In the end, most turned away and were not walking with Him anymore.

Over the past several weeks we read of distracted disciples unfocused on FOLLOWING Jesus – living like Jesus, taking His words to heart and changing their hearts. In the end, all but one went on to sacrifice their lives to spread the Gospel. They all lived Peter’s words: “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have words of eternal life.”

Certainly, Jesus followers stumble and fall. Certainly, Jesus followers struggle to live like Jesus, to integrate all He taught into their hearts and to express it in their lives in remarkably beautiful and sacrificial ways. Yet, they persist, get up, and try again.

Today, God is reminding us of a particular way we must live. It is a call to the kind of respect we are to have for each other. As the people of Jesus, as His FOLLOWERS, we need to view each and every person as bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh.

The recent drama around our nation’s latest Supreme Court nominee illustrates a failure of people to act in accord with God’s way. It is about how we treat each other. God’s creation speaks of a shared life – a commonality and dignity that belongs to each and every person. We are all bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh.

As we encounter people, we must remember that negative thoughts or actions toward them are nothing more than self-destruction. It is a break down of what God has built up. It is self-rejection.